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{{Infobox film
 
{{Infobox film
| name = The Pebble and the Penguin
+
|name = The Pebble and the Penguin
| image =
+
|image = The_pebble_and_the_penguin_poster.jpg
| caption =
+
|caption = Original theatrical release poster
| director = [[Don Bluth]]<br />[[Gary Goldman]]
+
|director = [[Don Bluth]]<br />[[Gary Goldman]]
| producer = Russell Boland<br />James Butterworth<br />[[Don Bluth]]<br />[[Gary Goldman]]
+
|producer = Russell Boland<br />James Butterworth<br />[[Don Bluth]]<br />[[Gary Goldman]]
| screenplay = Rachel Koretsky<br />Steven Whitestone
+
|screenplay = Rachel Koretsky<br />Steven Whitestone
| narrator = [[Shani Wallis]]
+
|starring = [[Martin Short]]<br />[[James Belushi]]<br />[[Tim Curry]]<br />[[Annie Golden]]
| starring = [[Martin Short]]<br />[[James Belushi]]<br />[[Tim Curry]]<br />[[Annie Golden]]
+
|music = [[Barry Manilow]]<br />Bruce Sussman (songs)<br />[[Mark Watters]] (score)
| music = [[Barry Manilow]]<br />Bruce Sussman (songs)<br />[[Mark Watters]] (score)
+
|studio = [[Sullivan Bluth Studios|Don Bluth Entertainment]]
| editing = Thomas Moss<br />Fiona Trayler
+
|distributor = [[Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer]] (North America)<br />[[Warner Bros. Family Entertainment]] (International)
| studio = [[Sullivan Bluth Studios|Don Bluth Entertainment]]
+
|release = April 12, 1995 (United States)<br />February 16, 1996 (United Kingdom)<br />December 31, 1997<br />(Australia)
| distributor = [[Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer]] (North America)<br />[[Warner Bros. Family Entertainment]] (International)
+
|time = 74 minutes
| release = April 12, 1995 (United States)<br />February 16, 1996 (United Kingdom) December 31st, 1997<br />(Australia)
+
|language = English
| runtime = 74 minutes
+
|budget = $28 million
| country = United States
+
|gross = $3.984 million
| language = English
+
|story =
| budget = $28 million
+
|based on =
| gross = $4 million
+
|writer =
  +
|cinematography =
  +
|editor =
  +
|preceded =
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|followed =
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|website =
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|imdb_id =
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|tv_com_id =
 
}}
 
}}
'''The Pebble and the Penguin''' is a 1995 American animated musical buddy comedy film, starring the voices of Martin Short and Jim Belushi, based on the true life mating rituals of the Adelie penguins in Antarctica, produced and directed by Don Bluth and Gary Goldman. The film was released to theaters on April 12, 1995 by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and internationally by Warner Bros. Family Entertainment.
+
'''''The Pebble and the Penguin''''' is a 1995 Irish-American animated musical buddy comedy film, starring the voices of Martin Short and Jim Belushi, based on the true life mating rituals of the Adelie penguins in Antarctica, produced and directed by Don Bluth and Gary Goldman. The film was released to theaters on April 12, 1995 by [[Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer]] and internationally by [[Warner Bros. Family Entertainment]].
  +
  +
Despite negative reviews, it perfomed more successfully at the box office, grossing $3.984 million worldwide against a $28 million budget, becoming one of the highest grossing animated films of 1995. It also managed to get a cult following since it's release.
   
 
==Plot==
 
==Plot==
Line 29: Line 29:
   
 
==Cast and characters==
 
==Cast and characters==
* [[Martin Short]] as Hubie, a shy, good-hearted adelie penguin. He forms a bond with Marina after showing her who he really is and she sees the real him. After he is thrown over the cliff by Drake, he must find his way home and win Marina over before Drake does.
+
* [[Martin Short]] as Hubie, a shy, good-hearted [[adelie penguin]]. He forms a bond with Marina after showing her who he really is and she sees the real him. After he is thrown over the cliff by Drake, he must find his way home and win Marina over before Drake does.
* [[James Belushi|Jim Belushi]] as Rocko, a streetwise Northern rockhopper penguin who befriends Hubie and helps him win Marina on the way back to [[Antarctica]].
+
* [[James Belushi|Jim Belushi]] as Rocko, a streetwise [[Northern rockhopper penguin]] who befriends Hubie and helps him win Marina on the way back to [[Antarctica]].
* [[Tim Curry]] as Drake, a hunky, dark-hearted penguin. He stops at nothing to win and tries to steal Marina from Hubie and continually bullies Hubie. He meets his end when, after trying to crush Hubie with a milestone, he accidentally causes the stadium to fall apart and collapse on top of him.
+
* [[Tim Curry]] as Drake, a hunky, dark-hearted penguin. He stops at nothing to win and tries to steal Marina from Hubie and continually bullies Hubie. He meets his end when after trying to crush Hubie, Rocko, and Marina with a giant stone, he accidentally causes the stadium to fall apart and collapse on top of him.
 
* [[Annie Golden]] as Marina, a penguin who Hubie and Drake fall in love with and cares about Hubie.
 
* [[Annie Golden]] as Marina, a penguin who Hubie and Drake fall in love with and cares about Hubie.
  +
* [[Will Ryan]] as Tika the ant and Royal
  +
* Alissa King as Petra
  +
* [[Stevie Vallance]] as Priscilla and the member of Chinstrap
  +
* [[Neil Ross]] as Scrawny
  +
* [[Stan Jones (actor)|Stan Jones]] as McCallister
  +
* [[S. Scott Bullock]] as Chubby and Gentoo
  +
* [[Philip L. Clarke]] as King
  +
* [[B.J. Ward]] and [[Hamilton Camp]] as the Magellanics
  +
* [[Angeline Ball]] as Gwynne and the member of Chinstrap
  +
* Kendall Cunningham as Timmy
  +
* [[Pat Musick]] as the member of Chinstrap
  +
* [[Michael Nunes]] as Beany
 
* [[Shani Wallis]] as the Narrator
 
* [[Shani Wallis]] as the Narrator
  +
* [[Frank Welker]] as Leopard Seal, and Killer Whales
  +
==Production==
  +
===Conception===
  +
The Animated Movie Guide said "considering the artistic and financial success of Disney's [[w:c:disney:Beauty and the Beast (1991 film)|Beauty and the Beast]], Don Bluth and Gary Goldman decided to cater to the dating crowd, in addition to preschoolers". The Pebble and the Penguin was produced by Don Bluth Ireland Limited. At one point, production began in November [[1991]]. The working title of the film was A Penguin Story. In [[1994]], "Bluth spoke enthusiastically of such pending projects as The Pebble and the Penguin and A Troll in Central Park". The film was originally slated for release in summer 1994 (while Thumbelina was scheduled for November 1993 and A Troll in Central Park was scheduled for March 1994), but due to some production difficulties (and probably to avoid competition with The Lion King, Baby's Day Out, Speed, and Forrest Gump), the film's release date was changed to April 1995.
  +
===Animation and research===
  +
Though Bluth Productions was based in Dublin, artists from Ireland, England and Hungary worked on the project, at least seven directing animators working on the film; among them John Pomeroy. The penguins in the film are clothed. Humans wearing penguin costumes were filmed and then used as photostat references for the animators. The iconic quote from Hubie, "Goodness glaciers!" as well as his overall appearance, is a sly reference to Gentleman Glacier, an old Canadian newspaper cartoon used to illustrate snow accumulation each year. Only two scenes in the film used computer generated imagery, one of which being "The Good Ship Misery" song sequence. The opening credit and overture sequence has the animated penguin characters playing and dancing on the sheet music for the songs in the film. According to The Free Lance–Star, the animators researched for the film by "watching documentaries and visiting zoos, such as San Diego's Sea World and Scotland's Glasgow Zoo". The site added that in promotional material, the animators explained they "discovered that the land of snow and ice shines with many different hues".
  +
===Production problems===
  +
Due to changes insisted by MGM, animation fell behind and additional coloring had to be done at a Hungarian animation studio. Don Bluth and Gary Goldman were so dissatisfied with the final film that they left during production (to help set up Fox Animation Studios) and demanded to be uncredited as the directors. The book Animated Films said, "changes at MGM during production...resulted in the project being affected in terms of production value". In a 2001 edition of his magazine Toon Talk, Bluth admitted "Penguin had story problems. We knew it. The crew knew it". Though he attempted to fix these issues when his Irish studio got taken over by the Hong Kong company Media Assets, "the story and film were now compromised", so neither he or Goldman stayed. They had their names removed from the film's credits and accepted an offer by Bill Mechanic - 20th Century Fox's then-president - to set up a new animation studio in the US (which would become Fox Animation Studios). Bluth said to his animation crew "I can't chew with someone else's mouth". Despite this executive interference, The Animated Movie Guide noted MGM/UA producer Walter Mirisch's comments on the film: "I think it's one of Don's best films ever...There's no issue of our claiming the credit for this. It's his film".
  +
==Music==
  +
{{main|The Pebble and the Penguin (soundtrack)}}
  +
==Release==
  +
===Theatrical===
  +
''The Pebble and the Penguin'' was released in United States on April 12, 1995. When the film was nearing completion, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer purchased the distribution rights in the United States, while Warner Bros. obtained the foreign distribution rights under the Warner Bros. Family Entertainment label.
  +
===Marketing===
  +
The film's tagline was "The adventure of a lifetime begins with one small pebble". Seventy-five readers of San Antonio Express-News each won four tickets to the film. The special showing was held at 11 a.m. on April 8 at the Embassy Theaters. The Pebble and the Penguin was cross-promoted with Anheuser-Busch's Sea World Parks.
  +
===Driving Mr. Pink===
  +
The Pebble and the Penguin was accompanied in its theater run by a new Pink Panther short entitled Driving Mr. Pink. in the United States, which was adapted from an episode of the successful Pink Panther TV series (though The Pebble and the Penguin was accompanied in its theater run by a new Looney Tunes short entitled Carrotblanca internationally). It is a late one-off short in the Pink Panther short series - they were abundant and popular until 1980. SFGate described the short as "loud, obnoxious, [and] idiotic". The short introduced the character of Voodoo Man from the 1995 TV show. In the cartoon, "an animated woman runs out of a department store with only her underwear on". It also "features car chases, yelling, and Pink Panther getting knocked around", and "there is a veiled reference to an offensive gesture during the Pink Panther cartoon".
  +
===Home media===
  +
The Pebble and the Penguin was released on VHS and LaserDisc on August 15, 1995 by MGM/UA Home Video. Warner Home Video released the film on VHS internationally in countries such as the UK and Australia.
   
  +
Throughout 1997, songs from the film were released alongside others from the MGM vaults in four MGM Sing-Along cassettes released by MGM. The loosely themed tapes had titles such as "Searching for Your Dreams", "Having Fun", and "Being Happy". The Pebble and the Penguin was first released on DVD in 1999.
   
  +
In 2001, the film was released alongside the 1978 animated film The Water Babies as a Side-to-Side VHS.
  +
  +
A "Family Fun Edition" of the film was released only in the United States and Canada on March 27, 2007 by 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment. Gary Goldman supervised the restoration for the "Family Fun Edition", which features color corrections, refielded scenes to hide missing effects and correct other errors from the theatrical release and the un-restored 1999 print of the DVD release. The Family Fun Edition was nominated for the Satellite Award for Best Youth DVD.
  +
  +
The 2007 DVD release of The Pebble and the Penguin was according to The Hindu News a part of a wave of penguin-related media consisting of March of the Penguins, Happy Feet, Farce of the Penguins, and Surf's Up. This trend was also picked up on by The Paramas Post and The Age. In 2010, the film was re-released along with Rock-a-Doodle as a double sided DVD, but it carries the un-restored 1999 print.
  +
  +
The film was released on Blu-ray for the first time on October 11, 2011.
  +
  +
As of March 20, 2019, the film's international rights licensing, along with the worldwide licensing to ''Thumbelina'' and ''A Troll in Central Park'', are currently licensed by the Walt Disney Studios, following their acquisition of 20th Century Fox (although since 2006 and until June 2020, Fox is handling home video distribution of the MGM library including The Pebble and the Penguin).
 
==Reception==
 
==Reception==
 
===Box Office===
 
===Box Office===
The Pebble and the Penguin flopped at the box-office and only grossed $3,983,912. It was overshadowed by A Goofy Movie which was released five days earlier.
+
''The Pebble and the Penguin'' was a financial success at the box-office and grossed $3.984 million worldwide against a $28 million budget, becoming one of the highest grossing animated films of 1995. Although it was considered a cult favorite since it's release, it was overshadowed by [[w:c:disney:A Goofy Movie|A Goofy Movie]] which was released five days earlier before the film's release.
  +
===Critical reception===
  +
{{Quote|One of animator Don Bluth's lesser efforts, The Pebble and the Penguin is cute but little more. The primary culprit is the script; aside from the unusual setting and small parcels of information about Emperor penguins, is hackneyed and uninvolving. The decision to focus on the relationship between Hubie and Rocko (while relegating the leading female character to nothing more than a trite damsel-in-distress role) is unfortunate, as the writers bring nothing new to the "buddy" concept and their attempts at humorous dialogue for the pair are often painful. With the exception of a song that pays homage to Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill, the Barry Manilow-Bruce Sussman songs are even worse. Bluth is incapable of creating bad animation, and there are several sequences (especially those taking place underwater) that have moments of beauty; overall, however, the animation doesn't have enough sparkle to breathe life into the movie. The cast is certainly not at fault, with Martin Short doing everything short of bursting through the screen to hold the viewer's attention, Tim Curry turning in a reliably sinister performance, and Annie Golden lending her powerful and unique belt to the little she is given to sing. Penguin is not totally without charm -- but the amount it has could almost be fit into a pebble.|A review of the film by AllRovi, concisely summing up the general consensus among reviews.}}
  +
On Rotten Tomatoes the film has a rating of 11% based on 9 reviews, with an average rating of 3.3/10. The film was given a Two Thumbs Down on Siskel & Ebert, with Gene Siskel noted that the film's animation looks "cheap and unfinished" and that "none of the songs are memorable" while Roger Ebert added his dislike of the "dumb songs", "silly story", and the film's color-coding of its heroes and villains. Ebert took this a step further by arguing "What do kids learn from this? Nothing overt. Just a quiet, unstated impression: White is good and brave, and brown is scheming and negative. Reinforce that through lots of cartoons (examples: Aladdin and The Rescuers Down Under) and no wonder even black children choose white dolls in some psychological experiments". Deseret News said, "the songs are forgettable, the story one-note and the characterizations quite weak". The Austin Chronicle said the film "lacks dramatic structure and narrative drive: Songs and animated action pieces are narratively connected but the film doesn't feel as though it is an organic whole. All the elements are here, they just don't come together". Time Out said "The characterisations are weak and unendearing. Worse, the big 'action' sequences turn up with the pacing and predictability of clock chimes. And, in what is perhaps the last great medium for musicals, the perfunctoriness of Barry Manilow's songs and arrangements seem guaranteed to put off yet another generation". The New York Times wrote that 4 would be "the optimum age for viewers of this gentle, animated musical", adding that "the action seems flat and low-rent compared to those earlier movies", and that it "doesn't have the vivid characters, first-rate animation or sense of adventure that turns movies like The Lion King into endlessly watchable favorites".
  +
  +
Washington Post Staff Writer Hal Hinson wrote, "the banality of the story, the pallid look, the flatness of the characters add up to a product that is, at best, second rate". SFGate said the "gnashing whale scenes are intense enough to push the G-rating envelope". The Spokesman-Review wrote, "it is only an average effort in virtually every respect". The Record said "The orchestration is too fancy, too loud and often drowns out the lyrics. This is a kid's movie, but musically it sounds like a full-costume Broadway show with full-supporting chorus line". It added "It's a little disturbing to see a children's movie that perpetuates the erroneous image of killer whales as violent creatures. It is, however, a perfect indication of the limited imagination which went into writing The Pebble and the Penguin". The Free Lance–Star said the film got a "charming mating ritual" and turned it into "sappy action romance with celebrity voices". The book Contemporary North American Film Directors suggested that the film suffered from "the same unimaginative and cliched Disney of the 1970s that Bluth had been so critical of". The Animated Movie Guide said, "the hero was a stuttering wimp, the songs didn't advance the plot, the dialogue was incessant and superfluous, and the pacing was plodding and dull".
  +
  +
Some critics did praise various aspects of the film, however, particularly in regard to Bluth's animation. These reviews, however, were almost exclusively mixed. Common Sense Media said, "the background animation of capricious weather conditions is lovely, as are the top-notch original songs by Barry Manilow and Mark Watters". Deseret News said: "Bluth's strength continues to be colorful, classical-style animation, and there are some gorgeous moments here — especially some underwater sequences". The Austin Chronicle said: "The Pebble and the Penguin features some beautifully animated sequences [...] The characters are great and the voice talents of Martin Short...and James Belushi...are terrific". Variety said the film has a "heartwarming story, some lively songs and professional animation", adding that it is "a sweet, enjoyable romantic tale more likely to succeed as an afternoon diversion on home video than on the big screen". The New York Times wrote "The tunes Mr. Manilow has written for the movie are, like his familiar pop standards, bouncy and catchy", and commented that "the animation is fine". Washington Post Staff Writer Hal Hinson wrote that "A flourishing opening number—titled 'Here and Now'—proves that Short can belt out a song with the best of them", adding that the "Bluth studio style of animation is passable, and, in the case of a Brecht-Weill flavored production number, occasionally inspired."
   
{{Stub}}
+
SFGate described the "show-tune- style songs" as "pleasant but forgettable", adding that "the singing by Short, Belushi, Curry and Broadway belter Golden is the best thing about the film". It also noted that "One of the obvious obstacles was how to color a film whose natural shadings tend toward black, white and degrees of gray. The result is a lot of odd but fascinating colorations -- the sky might turn up yellow at times, or the sea a deep maroon". The Spokesman-Review' wrote "in an era when G-rated movies are as rare as Hollywood humility, any attempt at family entertainment should be lauded", adding "let us salute Don Bluth and his team of animators". In a rare case, The Daily Gazette gave the film 4 stars. The Animated Movie Guide said the film was an "utter waste of talent and resources", due to interference from external forces. Monica Sullivan of Movie Magazine International noted that the film was "heartily enjoyed by the two little girls who saw it with me at a kiddie matinee".
{{Sec-stub}}
+
===Awards===
{{Warner Bros. Animation}}
+
The 2007 DVD release of The Pebble and Penguin was nominated for a Satellite Award for "Best Youth DVD" from the International Press Academy but was lost to [[Brad Bird]]'s Disney and Pixar animated [[w:c:disney:Ratatouille|Ratatouille]].
  +
==Transcript==
  +
{{Transcriptlink}}
  +
==Gallery==
  +
{{Gallerylink}}
  +
==Trivia==
  +
== External links ==
  +
* {{IMDb title|114108}}
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* {{Bcdb title|23404}}
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* {{AllMovie title|134628}}
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* {{Mojo title|pebbleandthepenguin}}
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* {{Rotten-tomatoes|pebble_and_the_penguin}}
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* {{WP}}
  +
{{Wikipedia}}
  +
{{The Pebble and the Penguin}}
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{{Warner Bros. theatrical animated features}}
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{{Warner Bros. Family Entertainment}}
  +
{{Warner Bros. films}}
  +
{{DEFAULTSORT:Pebble and the Penguin, The}}
 
[[Category:Films]]
 
[[Category:Films]]
 
[[Category:Warner Bros. films]]
 
[[Category:Warner Bros. films]]
[[Category:Warner Bros. animated films]]
 
 
[[Category:Don Bluth films]]
 
[[Category:Don Bluth films]]
 
[[Category:Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer films]]
 
[[Category:Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer films]]
 
[[Category:Animated films]]
 
[[Category:Animated films]]
[[Category:Musical films]]
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[[Category:Warner Bros. Pictures International films]]
[[Category:Animated musical films]]
 
 
[[Category:Warner Bros. Family Entertainment films]]
 
[[Category:Warner Bros. Family Entertainment films]]
[[Category:Drama films]]
 
 
[[Category:Films featuring anthropomorphic characters]]
 
[[Category:Films featuring anthropomorphic characters]]
[[Category:Non-Time Warner]]
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[[Category:Non-WarnerMedia]]
[[Category:Non-Time Warner films]]
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[[Category:1995 films]]
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[[Category:The Pebble and the Penguin]]
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[[Category:Theatrical films]]
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[[Category:G-rated films]]
  +
[[Category:Ex-WarnerMedia franchises]]
  +
[[Category:Traditionally Animated Films]]
  +
[[Category:Films Distributed by Warner Bros. in certain countries]]

Latest revision as of 21:55, February 16, 2020


The Pebble and the Penguin is a 1995 Irish-American animated musical buddy comedy film, starring the voices of Martin Short and Jim Belushi, based on the true life mating rituals of the Adelie penguins in Antarctica, produced and directed by Don Bluth and Gary Goldman. The film was released to theaters on April 12, 1995 by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and internationally by Warner Bros. Family Entertainment.

Despite negative reviews, it perfomed more successfully at the box office, grossing $3.984 million worldwide against a $28 million budget, becoming one of the highest grossing animated films of 1995. It also managed to get a cult following since it's release.

PlotEdit

Hubie, a shy, gullible, but kindhearted penguin, is in love with the female penguin Marina, but he lacks self-confidence leading him to be bullied by the much more impressive, but the vain and cruel Drake, who also wants Marina, but clearly for lust. One night, Hubie and Marina manage to confirm how they feel for each other, but Hubie cannot quite find a perfect pebble to propose to Marina with. He wishes on a star to make his dream come true and he receives an emerald from the sky. Ecstatic, Hubie rushes to find Marina but is thwarted by Drake, who demands Hubie to give him the pebble. When Hubie refuses, Drake throws him into the water. Hubie narrowly escapes from a leopard seal and climbs on to a piece of ice where he is swept away from Antarctica.

Hubie is picked up by humans and caged on their ship called "Misery", transports penguins to a zoo and meets a tough, grumpy, streetwise and somewhat arrogant but good-hearted rockhopper penguin named Rocko. After seeing in a vision Marina having a dilemma, Hubie decides to escape with Rocko and flees, before laying low on a beach. Rocko reluctantly tells Hubie about his desire to fly and live in tropical climate. He convinces him to help him return to Antarctica by making up a lie about a flying penguin named Waldo. They have a short fight after Rocko tries to fly off "an authentic, ancient aviarial airstrip" and another after Rocko saved Hubie from a killer whale. Back in Antarctica, Drake begins to threaten Marina for her hand in mating. If Marina refuses, she will be forced to leave, as it goes against tradition. Hubie and Rocko attempt to depart, but Rocko discovers Hubie lied to him and attempts to attack Hubie, but soon starts laughing, praising Hubie's determination to get back to Marina. Back in Antarctica, Marina becomes worried about Hubie. Hubie and Rocko run into the hungry and persistent leopard seal but are able to escape it. With that they become true friends (though it takes prodding from Hubie for Rocko to admit it). Their joy is short lived as killer whales attack them causing Hubie's pebble to get lost in the scuffle and Rocko to go missing, leaving Hubie to think he perished.

Disheartened, Hubie continues on alone to face Drake and defeats him in a fight. Rocko, who survives the whale attack, finds Hubie and Marina at Drake's tower. As Hubie makes a proposal to Marina and gains her acceptance, Drake returns to finish the three off. Hubie, Rocko, and Marina dodge the giant boulder which lethally crushes Drake in his collapsing tower. During the escape, Rocko's dream for flight comes true as he flies himself, Hubie, and Marina to safety. Rocko hands Hubie his pebble. He presents it to Marina, who loves it, but loves Hubie more. Rocko remains in Antarctica with Hubie and Marina, and sometime later, he teaches their children how to fly.

Cast and charactersEdit

  • Martin Short as Hubie, a shy, good-hearted adelie penguin. He forms a bond with Marina after showing her who he really is and she sees the real him. After he is thrown over the cliff by Drake, he must find his way home and win Marina over before Drake does.
  • Jim Belushi as Rocko, a streetwise Northern rockhopper penguin who befriends Hubie and helps him win Marina on the way back to Antarctica.
  • Tim Curry as Drake, a hunky, dark-hearted penguin. He stops at nothing to win and tries to steal Marina from Hubie and continually bullies Hubie. He meets his end when after trying to crush Hubie, Rocko, and Marina with a giant stone, he accidentally causes the stadium to fall apart and collapse on top of him.
  • Annie Golden as Marina, a penguin who Hubie and Drake fall in love with and cares about Hubie.
  • Will Ryan as Tika the ant and Royal
  • Alissa King as Petra
  • Stevie Vallance as Priscilla and the member of Chinstrap
  • Neil Ross as Scrawny
  • Stan Jones as McCallister
  • S. Scott Bullock as Chubby and Gentoo
  • Philip L. Clarke as King
  • B.J. Ward and Hamilton Camp as the Magellanics
  • Angeline Ball as Gwynne and the member of Chinstrap
  • Kendall Cunningham as Timmy
  • Pat Musick as the member of Chinstrap
  • Michael Nunes as Beany
  • Shani Wallis as the Narrator
  • Frank Welker as Leopard Seal, and Killer Whales

ProductionEdit

ConceptionEdit

The Animated Movie Guide said "considering the artistic and financial success of Disney's Beauty and the Beast, Don Bluth and Gary Goldman decided to cater to the dating crowd, in addition to preschoolers". The Pebble and the Penguin was produced by Don Bluth Ireland Limited. At one point, production began in November 1991. The working title of the film was A Penguin Story. In 1994, "Bluth spoke enthusiastically of such pending projects as The Pebble and the Penguin and A Troll in Central Park". The film was originally slated for release in summer 1994 (while Thumbelina was scheduled for November 1993 and A Troll in Central Park was scheduled for March 1994), but due to some production difficulties (and probably to avoid competition with The Lion King, Baby's Day Out, Speed, and Forrest Gump), the film's release date was changed to April 1995.

Animation and researchEdit

Though Bluth Productions was based in Dublin, artists from Ireland, England and Hungary worked on the project, at least seven directing animators working on the film; among them John Pomeroy. The penguins in the film are clothed. Humans wearing penguin costumes were filmed and then used as photostat references for the animators. The iconic quote from Hubie, "Goodness glaciers!" as well as his overall appearance, is a sly reference to Gentleman Glacier, an old Canadian newspaper cartoon used to illustrate snow accumulation each year. Only two scenes in the film used computer generated imagery, one of which being "The Good Ship Misery" song sequence. The opening credit and overture sequence has the animated penguin characters playing and dancing on the sheet music for the songs in the film. According to The Free Lance–Star, the animators researched for the film by "watching documentaries and visiting zoos, such as San Diego's Sea World and Scotland's Glasgow Zoo". The site added that in promotional material, the animators explained they "discovered that the land of snow and ice shines with many different hues".

Production problemsEdit

Due to changes insisted by MGM, animation fell behind and additional coloring had to be done at a Hungarian animation studio. Don Bluth and Gary Goldman were so dissatisfied with the final film that they left during production (to help set up Fox Animation Studios) and demanded to be uncredited as the directors. The book Animated Films said, "changes at MGM during production...resulted in the project being affected in terms of production value". In a 2001 edition of his magazine Toon Talk, Bluth admitted "Penguin had story problems. We knew it. The crew knew it". Though he attempted to fix these issues when his Irish studio got taken over by the Hong Kong company Media Assets, "the story and film were now compromised", so neither he or Goldman stayed. They had their names removed from the film's credits and accepted an offer by Bill Mechanic - 20th Century Fox's then-president - to set up a new animation studio in the US (which would become Fox Animation Studios). Bluth said to his animation crew "I can't chew with someone else's mouth". Despite this executive interference, The Animated Movie Guide noted MGM/UA producer Walter Mirisch's comments on the film: "I think it's one of Don's best films ever...There's no issue of our claiming the credit for this. It's his film".

MusicEdit

Main article: The Pebble and the Penguin (soundtrack)

ReleaseEdit

TheatricalEdit

The Pebble and the Penguin was released in United States on April 12, 1995. When the film was nearing completion, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer purchased the distribution rights in the United States, while Warner Bros. obtained the foreign distribution rights under the Warner Bros. Family Entertainment label.

MarketingEdit

The film's tagline was "The adventure of a lifetime begins with one small pebble". Seventy-five readers of San Antonio Express-News each won four tickets to the film. The special showing was held at 11 a.m. on April 8 at the Embassy Theaters. The Pebble and the Penguin was cross-promoted with Anheuser-Busch's Sea World Parks.

Driving Mr. PinkEdit

The Pebble and the Penguin was accompanied in its theater run by a new Pink Panther short entitled Driving Mr. Pink. in the United States, which was adapted from an episode of the successful Pink Panther TV series (though The Pebble and the Penguin was accompanied in its theater run by a new Looney Tunes short entitled Carrotblanca internationally). It is a late one-off short in the Pink Panther short series - they were abundant and popular until 1980. SFGate described the short as "loud, obnoxious, [and] idiotic". The short introduced the character of Voodoo Man from the 1995 TV show. In the cartoon, "an animated woman runs out of a department store with only her underwear on". It also "features car chases, yelling, and Pink Panther getting knocked around", and "there is a veiled reference to an offensive gesture during the Pink Panther cartoon".

Home mediaEdit

The Pebble and the Penguin was released on VHS and LaserDisc on August 15, 1995 by MGM/UA Home Video. Warner Home Video released the film on VHS internationally in countries such as the UK and Australia.

Throughout 1997, songs from the film were released alongside others from the MGM vaults in four MGM Sing-Along cassettes released by MGM. The loosely themed tapes had titles such as "Searching for Your Dreams", "Having Fun", and "Being Happy". The Pebble and the Penguin was first released on DVD in 1999.

In 2001, the film was released alongside the 1978 animated film The Water Babies as a Side-to-Side VHS.

A "Family Fun Edition" of the film was released only in the United States and Canada on March 27, 2007 by 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment. Gary Goldman supervised the restoration for the "Family Fun Edition", which features color corrections, refielded scenes to hide missing effects and correct other errors from the theatrical release and the un-restored 1999 print of the DVD release. The Family Fun Edition was nominated for the Satellite Award for Best Youth DVD.

The 2007 DVD release of The Pebble and the Penguin was according to The Hindu News a part of a wave of penguin-related media consisting of March of the Penguins, Happy Feet, Farce of the Penguins, and Surf's Up. This trend was also picked up on by The Paramas Post and The Age. In 2010, the film was re-released along with Rock-a-Doodle as a double sided DVD, but it carries the un-restored 1999 print.

The film was released on Blu-ray for the first time on October 11, 2011.

As of March 20, 2019, the film's international rights licensing, along with the worldwide licensing to Thumbelina and A Troll in Central Park, are currently licensed by the Walt Disney Studios, following their acquisition of 20th Century Fox (although since 2006 and until June 2020, Fox is handling home video distribution of the MGM library including The Pebble and the Penguin).

ReceptionEdit

Box OfficeEdit

The Pebble and the Penguin was a financial success at the box-office and grossed $3.984 million worldwide against a $28 million budget, becoming one of the highest grossing animated films of 1995. Although it was considered a cult favorite since it's release, it was overshadowed by A Goofy Movie which was released five days earlier before the film's release.

Critical receptionEdit

One of animator Don Bluth's lesser efforts, The Pebble and the Penguin is cute but little more. The primary culprit is the script; aside from the unusual setting and small parcels of information about Emperor penguins, is hackneyed and uninvolving. The decision to focus on the relationship between Hubie and Rocko (while relegating the leading female character to nothing more than a trite damsel-in-distress role) is unfortunate, as the writers bring nothing new to the "buddy" concept and their attempts at humorous dialogue for the pair are often painful. With the exception of a song that pays homage to Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill, the Barry Manilow-Bruce Sussman songs are even worse. Bluth is incapable of creating bad animation, and there are several sequences (especially those taking place underwater) that have moments of beauty; overall, however, the animation doesn't have enough sparkle to breathe life into the movie. The cast is certainly not at fault, with Martin Short doing everything short of bursting through the screen to hold the viewer's attention, Tim Curry turning in a reliably sinister performance, and Annie Golden lending her powerful and unique belt to the little she is given to sing. Penguin is not totally without charm -- but the amount it has could almost be fit into a pebble.
―A review of the film by AllRovi, concisely summing up the general consensus among reviews.

On Rotten Tomatoes the film has a rating of 11% based on 9 reviews, with an average rating of 3.3/10. The film was given a Two Thumbs Down on Siskel & Ebert, with Gene Siskel noted that the film's animation looks "cheap and unfinished" and that "none of the songs are memorable" while Roger Ebert added his dislike of the "dumb songs", "silly story", and the film's color-coding of its heroes and villains. Ebert took this a step further by arguing "What do kids learn from this? Nothing overt. Just a quiet, unstated impression: White is good and brave, and brown is scheming and negative. Reinforce that through lots of cartoons (examples: Aladdin and The Rescuers Down Under) and no wonder even black children choose white dolls in some psychological experiments". Deseret News said, "the songs are forgettable, the story one-note and the characterizations quite weak". The Austin Chronicle said the film "lacks dramatic structure and narrative drive: Songs and animated action pieces are narratively connected but the film doesn't feel as though it is an organic whole. All the elements are here, they just don't come together". Time Out said "The characterisations are weak and unendearing. Worse, the big 'action' sequences turn up with the pacing and predictability of clock chimes. And, in what is perhaps the last great medium for musicals, the perfunctoriness of Barry Manilow's songs and arrangements seem guaranteed to put off yet another generation". The New York Times wrote that 4 would be "the optimum age for viewers of this gentle, animated musical", adding that "the action seems flat and low-rent compared to those earlier movies", and that it "doesn't have the vivid characters, first-rate animation or sense of adventure that turns movies like The Lion King into endlessly watchable favorites".

Washington Post Staff Writer Hal Hinson wrote, "the banality of the story, the pallid look, the flatness of the characters add up to a product that is, at best, second rate". SFGate said the "gnashing whale scenes are intense enough to push the G-rating envelope". The Spokesman-Review wrote, "it is only an average effort in virtually every respect". The Record said "The orchestration is too fancy, too loud and often drowns out the lyrics. This is a kid's movie, but musically it sounds like a full-costume Broadway show with full-supporting chorus line". It added "It's a little disturbing to see a children's movie that perpetuates the erroneous image of killer whales as violent creatures. It is, however, a perfect indication of the limited imagination which went into writing The Pebble and the Penguin". The Free Lance–Star said the film got a "charming mating ritual" and turned it into "sappy action romance with celebrity voices". The book Contemporary North American Film Directors suggested that the film suffered from "the same unimaginative and cliched Disney of the 1970s that Bluth had been so critical of". The Animated Movie Guide said, "the hero was a stuttering wimp, the songs didn't advance the plot, the dialogue was incessant and superfluous, and the pacing was plodding and dull".

Some critics did praise various aspects of the film, however, particularly in regard to Bluth's animation. These reviews, however, were almost exclusively mixed. Common Sense Media said, "the background animation of capricious weather conditions is lovely, as are the top-notch original songs by Barry Manilow and Mark Watters". Deseret News said: "Bluth's strength continues to be colorful, classical-style animation, and there are some gorgeous moments here — especially some underwater sequences". The Austin Chronicle said: "The Pebble and the Penguin features some beautifully animated sequences [...] The characters are great and the voice talents of Martin Short...and James Belushi...are terrific". Variety said the film has a "heartwarming story, some lively songs and professional animation", adding that it is "a sweet, enjoyable romantic tale more likely to succeed as an afternoon diversion on home video than on the big screen". The New York Times wrote "The tunes Mr. Manilow has written for the movie are, like his familiar pop standards, bouncy and catchy", and commented that "the animation is fine". Washington Post Staff Writer Hal Hinson wrote that "A flourishing opening number—titled 'Here and Now'—proves that Short can belt out a song with the best of them", adding that the "Bluth studio style of animation is passable, and, in the case of a Brecht-Weill flavored production number, occasionally inspired."

SFGate described the "show-tune- style songs" as "pleasant but forgettable", adding that "the singing by Short, Belushi, Curry and Broadway belter Golden is the best thing about the film". It also noted that "One of the obvious obstacles was how to color a film whose natural shadings tend toward black, white and degrees of gray. The result is a lot of odd but fascinating colorations -- the sky might turn up yellow at times, or the sea a deep maroon". The Spokesman-Review' wrote "in an era when G-rated movies are as rare as Hollywood humility, any attempt at family entertainment should be lauded", adding "let us salute Don Bluth and his team of animators". In a rare case, The Daily Gazette gave the film 4 stars. The Animated Movie Guide said the film was an "utter waste of talent and resources", due to interference from external forces. Monica Sullivan of Movie Magazine International noted that the film was "heartily enjoyed by the two little girls who saw it with me at a kiddie matinee".

AwardsEdit

The 2007 DVD release of The Pebble and Penguin was nominated for a Satellite Award for "Best Youth DVD" from the International Press Academy but was lost to Brad Bird's Disney and Pixar animated Ratatouille.

TranscriptEdit

GalleryEdit

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THE PEBBLE AND THE PENGUIN TRANSPARENT LOGO
Media
Film | Video | Soundtack
Characters
Hubie | Rocko | Marina | Drake | Drake's Goons | Petra, Timmy, and Beany | Gwynne, Priscilla and Pola | The Chinstraps | The Magellanics | Leopard Seal | Orcas | Tika
Objects
Hubie's Pebble
Locations
The Rookery | Drake's lair | Hubie's Cliff | Misery | Bounty Island | Rock Island | Friendly Iceberg | Death Berg
Songs
Now and Forever | Sometimes I Wonder | The Good Ship Misery | Don't Make Me Laugh | Looks Like I Got Me a Friend
See also
Metro–Goldwyn–Mayer | Warner Bros. Family Entertainment


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