FANDOM


Line 19: Line 19:
 
|num_employees =
 
|num_employees =
 
|parent = Viacom
 
|parent = Viacom
|homepage =[[www.paramount.com]]
+
|homepage =[http://www.paramount.com Official website]
 
|assets = Paramount Television
 
|assets = Paramount Television
 
|divisions = Paramount Television
 
|divisions = Paramount Television

Revision as of 02:14, February 5, 2018

Paramount Pictures Corporation (commonly known as Paramount Studios or simply Paramount, and formerly known as Famous Players-Lasky Corporation) is an American film studio, television production company and motion picture distributor, consistently ranked as one of the "Big Six" film studios of Hollywood. It is a subsidiary of U.S. media conglomerate Viacom. Paramount is a member of the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA).

In 2014, Paramount Pictures became the first major Hollywood studio to distribute all of its films in digital-form only.

Paramount is the fifth oldest surviving film studio in the world, and America's oldest running studio, founded in 1912.

It basically features a snow capped mountain with 22 stars encircling it, "Paramount" in its signature script appears on the peak of the mountain, and the byline appears at the bottom of the mountain.;

Films that Paramount has collaborated with Warner Bros.

  • The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1914; survives; Rights now owned by Warner Bros.)
  • The Magic Cloak of Oz (1914; survives; Rights now owned by Warner Bros.)
  • Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931; Paramount originally distributed the film; Now owned by Turner Entertainment, distributed through Warner Bros.)
  • A Farewell to Arms (1932; Paramount originally distributed the film, it's later re-released by Warner Bros. in 1949)
  • Zero Hour! (1957; Paramount originally distributed the film; Rights now owned by Warner Bros.)
  • Seven Days in May (1964; Paramount originally distributed the film; Rights now owned by Warner Bros.)
  • Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (1971; Paramount originally distributed the film, but handed the film rights to Warner Bros. in 1980)
  • Friday the 13th (1980; Nominee of the Razzie Award for Worst Picture. US distribution only, co-production with Warner Bros. Pictures and Sean S. Cunningham Films)
  • Night School (1981; Paramount originally distributed the film, co-produced by Lorimar; Rights now owned by Warner Bros.)
  • Second-Hand Hearts (1981; Paramount originally distributed the film, co-produced by Lorimar; Rights now owned by Warner Bros.)
  • The Sea Wolves (1981; Paramount originally distributed the film, co-produced by Lorimar; Rights now owned by Warner Bros.)
  • S.O.B. (1981; Paramount originally distributed the film, co-produced by Lorimar; Rights now owned by Warner Bros.)
  • Escape to Victory (1981; Paramount originally distributed the film, co-produced by Lorimar; Rights now owned by Warner Bros.)
  • Love and Money (1982; Paramount originally distributed the film, co-produced by Lorimar; Rights now owned by Warner Bros.)
  • Lookin' to Get Out (1982; Paramount originally distributed the film, co-produced by Lorimar; Rights now owned by Warner Bros.)
  • Heidi's Song (1982; Paramount originally distributed the film, produced by Hanna-Barbera; Rights now owned by Warner Bros.)
  • FairyTale: A True Story (1997; US distribution only; co-production with Warner Bros., Icon Productions, Icon Entertainment International, Wendy Finerman Productions and Anna K. Production C.V.)
  • Payback (1999; US distribution only, co-production with Warner Bros. Pictures and Icon Productions)
  • South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut (1999; US distribution only, co-production with Warner Bros. Pictures, Scott Rudin Productions and Comedy Central Films)
  • Wonder Boys (2000; US distribution only, co-production with Warner Bros., Mutual Film Company, Curtis Hanson Productions, Scott Rudin Productions and Tele Munchen Gruppe)
  • Flags of our Fathers (2006; US distribution only, co-production with Warner Bros., DreamWorks, Amblin Entertainment and Malpaso Productions)
  • Zodiac (2007; US distribution only, co-production with Warner Bros. and Phoenix Pictures)
  • Beowulf (2007; US distribution only, co-production with Warner Bros. Pictures, Shangri-La Entertainment and ImageMovers)
  • Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (2007; US distribution only, co-production with Warner Bros., DreamWorks Pictures, Parkes/MacDonald Productions and the Zanuck Company)
  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008; Nominee of the Academy Award for Best Picture. US distribution only, co-production with Warner Bros. Pictures and The Kennedy/Marshall Company)
  • Friday the 13th (2009; co-production with New Line Cinema and Platinum Dunes)
  • Watchmen (2009; International distribution only, co-production with Warner Bros. Pictures, Legendary Pictures and Lawrence Gordon Productions)
  • Interstellar (2014; North American distribution only, co-production with Warner Bros. Pictures, Legendary Pictures and Syncopy Inc.)
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.